About Art for the Globe's logo, "Klotet" (the Globe).

Artist Eva Hallström (1942-1997) painted "Klotet" in 1991.

"I bought the painting when I visited Eva's studio on Hornsgatspuckeln ("the Horngatan hump") in Stockholm. I was actually there to buy art to decorate the new wing of Stockholm Sjukhem clinic. Eva's powerful, moving painting had fascinated me for many years. I was now able to buy some vibrant paintings of flowers with Eva's characteristic colour and form. A dramatic and powerful painting of a planet dangerously close to falling off a white table into infinite blackness was leaning against a wall. A very compelling painting.

It spoke of more than a threatened world. It also visualised Eva's own mental illness. I've asked Eva's son Lasse if it was OK to talk about it. He gave his blessing. Eva was quite open about her major depressive disorder. She seemed quite comfortable talking about her illness. She knew that I was a doctor and not just a gallery owner. She often lapsed into psychoses preceded by symptoms a few weeks in advance. She took drugs that suppressed or dispersed the psychosis. That put her in a deep dilemma: if she deliberately avoided taking the tablets, she created fantastic paintings in the pre-psychosis phase. But if she took them, her paintings became bland and mediocre. Occasionally, she would choose the first alternative at the cost of a period struggling with psychosis.

I believe that the planet represents Eva in the painting, falling into a psychosis.

Eva died at the early age of 55. She suffered from lung emphysema as a result of heavy smoking.

The choice of “The Globe” as the logo of Art for the Globe is my way of posthumously saluting an important artist."

About Art for the Globe's logo, "Klotet" (the Globe).

Artist Eva Hallström (1942-1997) painted "Klotet" in 1991.

"I bought the painting when I visited Eva's studio on Hornsgatspuckeln ("the Horngatan hump") in Stockholm. I was actually there to buy art to decorate the new wing of Stockholm Sjukhem clinic. Eva's powerful, moving painting had fascinated me for many years. I was now able to buy some vibrant paintings of flowers with Eva's characteristic colour and form. A dramatic and powerful painting of a planet dangerously close to falling off a white table into infinite blackness was leaning against a wall. A very compelling painting.

It spoke of more than a threatened world. It also visualised Eva's own mental illness. I've asked Eva's son Lasse if it was OK to talk about it. He gave his blessing. Eva was quite open about her major depressive disorder. She seemed quite comfortable talking about her illness. She knew that I was a doctor and not just a gallery owner. She often lapsed into psychoses preceded by symptoms a few weeks in advance. She took drugs that suppressed or dispersed the psychosis. That put her in a deep dilemma: if she deliberately avoided taking the tablets, she created fantastic paintings in the pre-psychosis phase. But if she took them, her paintings became bland and mediocre. Occasionally, she would choose the first alternative at the cost of a period struggling with psychosis.

I believe that the planet represents Eva in the painting, falling into a psychosis.

Eva died at the early age of 55. She suffered from lung emphysema as a result of heavy smoking.

The choice of “The Globe” as the logo of Art for the Globe is my way of posthumously saluting an important artist."

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